Neglected Tragedy

I’ve always been a fairly anxious person. I’m a type-A over-thinker, rarely taking risks. I thoroughly weigh both sides of a decision and research topics thoroughly.  During my first pregnancy I did a lot of reading. A lot. I know many mothers do so I’m uncertain if the amount of reading and research I did was “normal.” Regardless, there was me and Google at all hours of the day and night reading about group B strep, gestational diabetes, cesarean sections, inductions, vacuum extractions, forceps extractions, vaccines, vitamin K, and antibiotics in labor. I researched car seat safety, cribs and crib mattresses, toxins in disposable diapers, bed-sharing, baby gates, child safety products and daycares. I bought cordless blinds for the nursery. Once my daughter was rolling over, I moved her changing mat to the floor and removed her heavy dresser from her nursery. I breastfed for an atypical length of time. I kept her rear-facing in her car seat beyond the age of 3 years. Even now, at age 4, I won’t leave my daughter in the bathtub alone for more than 30 seconds. We don’t own guns. Every winter, my husband rolls his eyes when I give him the repeat lecture about puffy winter coats in the car seat. And years ago, when my husband and I were house hunting, I insisted that we not even consider a home with a swimming pool.

I’m not paranoid. I’m cautious. I’m careful.

And as I’ve said before, I took every precaution during both of my pregnancies.

As a society we are talking about a lot of important issues. We talk about not leaving children alone in hot cars. We talk about vaccinating. We talk about safe sleep. We talk about anchoring furniture to walls. We talk about baby gates. We talk about car seat safety. As a result, change is happening. Deaths and injuries are declining and I think this is amazing. For example, since the launch of the Back to Sleep Campaign in 1994, the rate of SIDS in the United States has decreased by 50%.

But we aren’t talking about stillbirth. The World Health Organization (WHO) calls this a neglected tragedy.

Annually, on average, in the United States:

Number of children who die from strangulation from window blind cords: 11

Number of children who die from furniture and televisions falling on them: 26

Number of children who die as a result of being left in a hot car: 37

Number of children who die from influenza: 37-171

Number of children who die from choking on food: 73

Number of babies who drown in bathtubs: 87

Number of children who die from accidental falls: 140

Number of people who die from listeriosis: 260

Number of children who die from accidental poisoning: 730

Number of people who die from toxoplasmosis: 750

Number of children who die from guns: 1,300

Number of sleep-related infant deaths: 4,000

Number of children under age 12 who die in car accidents: 9,000

Number of stillbirths (28+weeks gestation): 11,260

My point isn’t to minimize the seriousness of senseless tragedies. One dead child is one too many.  I HATE reading stories about children left in hot cars. Or dying in car accidents. Or from unsafe sleeping conditions. I hate it. And I hope you hate it too. But I also want you to hate the neglected tragedy of stillbirth. I want you to hate the fact that, worldwide, 2.6 million babies are stillborn each year. I want you to hate that stillbirth rates in the United Kingdom, France, and Austria are the worst among developed nations. I want you to hate that the stillbirth rate in the United States has not changed in the past 50 years. I want you to hate that the stillbirth rate for African-American women is DOUBLE than for women of other races. I want you to hate that the United States doesn’t value stillbirth research.

I want you to hate this neglected tragedy.

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6 thoughts on “Neglected Tragedy”

  1. I totally agree that there should be more research dedicated to stillbirths. I would love to know why my daughters’ hearts stopped beating. No one knows. And I’ve been tested and poked and prodded, but everything comes back normal (except for an MTHFR mutation, but the one I have is not the clotting one, and my MFM says that my last daughter did not die due to clotting, even tiny clotting). I am thankful that all of my doctors are both stumped and ready to fix it. They acknowledge their limitations, but still are willing to do whatever they can in their power to help me bring a healthy baby into this world. I’ve heard of women who did not have this kind of care, and I believe that this should be the basic care of all pregnant ladies. (It does help that my MFM is an academic and that he sees my case with a special kind of interest. I am hoping that in the next pregnancy that all will be revealed.)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, Katy, I am sorry you have endured this heart-break more than once. It’s wonderful that you have such dedicated doctors. When researching for this post I read that 50% of stillbirths are unexplained. In my case, testing indicated massive fetomaternal hemorrhage but nobody could identify why it happened, therefore there isn’t really a way to prevent it from happening in the future. Without research, prevention is near impossible.

      Like

  2. This was a really well done post. I will likely share this with friends and family in October for pregnancy and infant loss awareness month. I had no idea how common stillbirth was until it happened to me.

    Liked by 1 person

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